BS Biological Sciences (Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior)




Program Description

The neurobiology, physiology and behavior concentration serves students in the biological sciences BS degree program with a broad yet rigorous education.

While it might seem that neurobiology, physiology and behavior are quite separate fields, the three interact extensively in living organisms to achieve common goals. By studying neurobiology, behavior and physiology from the perspectives of molecular and cellular biology, evolution, organ systems (neural, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, etc.) and the environment, students gain insight into how these aspects work together in a variety of ways. Students in this concentration also learn to apply principles from mathematics, chemistry and physics. Discoveries are made at the laboratory bench and in the field, and students in the concentration are encouraged to participate in research projects in the labs of our faculty members.

All Life Science degrees can be used to enter medical school. To find out more about pre-med facts visit our pre-med FAQ page

This program is available as an accelerated degree. Classes for a typical four-year program are written below. If you are interested in the accelerated degree program please visit our accelerated degree program page.

Due to the high volume of overlap in curriculum, students enrolled in a Bachelor of Science degree in the School of Life Sciences may be restricted from declaring a concurrent degree within the school. Students should speak with their academic advisor for any further questions.


Required Courses (Major Map)

Major Map

Major Map on-campus archive

What if: See how your courses can be applied to another major and find out how to change your major.


At a Glance: program details

  • Location: Tempe campus
  • Additional Program Fee: Yes
  • Second Language Requirement: No
  • First Required Math Course: MAT 251 - Calculus for Life Sciences
  • Math Intensity: Moderate program math intensity moderate


Major concentration courses

  • BIO 331 Animal Behavior (3)
  • BIO 360 Animal Physiology (3)
  • BCH 361 Principles of Biochemistry (3) or BCH 461 General Biochemistry (3)

Major core electives (complete two of the following)

  • BIO 436 Sociobiology and Behavioral Ecology (3)
  • BIO 461 Comparative Animal Physiology (3)
  • BIO 462 Endocrine Physiology (3)
  • BIO 467 Neurobiology (3)
  • BIO/MIC 420 Immunology: Cellular and Molecular Foundations (3)

Major comparative structure and function courses (complete one of the following)

  • BIO 351 Developmental Biology (3)
  • BIO 370 Vertebrate Zoology (4)
  • BIO 385 Comparative Invertebrate Zoology (4)
  • PSY 426 Neuroanatomy (4)

Please see an advisor if courses are not offered in the term you wish to take them

Major laboratory/research courses (complete one of the following)

  • BCH 367 Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory (1)
  • BCH 467 Analytical Biochemistry Laboratory (3)
  • BIO 308 Plant Physiology (4)
  • BIO 342 General Genetics Laboratory (2)
  • BIO/MBB 343 Genetic Engineering and Society (4)
  • BIO 352 Laboratory in Vertebrate Developmental Anatomy (2)
  • BIO 361 Animal Physiology Laboratory (2)
  • BIO 435 Research Techniques in Animal Behavior (3)
  • BIO 451 Cell Biotechnology Laboratory (4)
  • MIC 421 Experimental Immunology (2)
  • BIO/HPS/MIC/MBB 495 Undergraduate Research or BIO/HPS/MIC/MBB 484 Internship or BIO/MIC/MBB 492 Honors Directed Study may be substituted for one lab course (1-3)

Major electives

Any SOLS upper division coursework (300 and 400 level BIO/HPS/MIC/MBB) will count in this area, including BCH 361, that has not already been used in the major area.

Requirements in related fields 

General chemistry 
  • CHM 113 General Chemistry I (4)
  • CHM 116 General Chemistry II (4)
Organic Chemistry (take general or pre-health sequence)
  • CHM 231 Elementary Organic Chemistry  (3)
  • CHM 235 Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1)
OR pre-health sequence
  • CHM 233 General Organic Chemistry I (3)
  • CHM 234 General Organic Chemistry II (3)
  • CHM 237 General Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1)
  • CHM 238 General Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1)
Physics (take general or pre-health sequence)
  • PHY 101 Introduction to Physics  (4)
OR pre-health sequence
  • PHY 111 General Physics I (3)
  • PHY 112 General Physics II (3)
  • PHY 113 General Physics Laboratory I (1)
  • PHY 114 General Physics Laboratory II (1)
Math (complete one of the following)
  • MAT 251 Calculus for Life Sciences (3)
  • MAT 210 Brief Calculus (3)
Statistics (complete one of the following)
  • STP 231 Statistics for Biosciences (3) 
  • STP 226 Elementary Statistics (3)

For more information on requirements and recommendations specific to this degree please see our Did you know for on-campus degrees page.



Admission Requirements

All students are required to meet general university admission requirements.

Freshman Transfer International Readmission

Transfer Options

ASU is committed to helping students thrive by offering tools that allow personalization of the transfer path to ASU. Students may use the Transfer Map search to outline a list of recommended courses to take prior to transfer.

ASU has transfer partnerships in Arizona and across the country to create a simplified transfer experience for students. These pathway programs include exclusive benefits, tools and resources, and help students save time and money in their college journey. Students may learn more about these programs by visiting the admission site: https://admission.asu.edu/transfer/pathway-programs.



Change of Major Requirements

A current ASU student has no additional requirements for changing majors.

Students should refer to https://changingmajors.asu.edu for information about how to change a major to this program.



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Career Outlook

The broad education and critical-thinking skills students receive in this concentration are applicable to a variety of rewarding careers. Premedical, preveterinary and predental students get the background and courses needed for professional school application and beyond. Many students go on to graduate school for academic, teaching or research careers in areas such as:

  • endocrinology
  • environmental or behavioral physiology
  • human physiology
  • metabolism
  • neurobiology
  • social behavior

With a Bachelor of Science degree in this concentration, graduates have opportunities for technical positions in hospitals, research institutes and industry (food, dairy, chemical, pharmaceutical and biotechnology) as well as in government laboratories and agencies. The most important skills students learn in the concentration are critical thinking and problem-solving skills that can be applied to many scientific problems and professions as well as to the challenges of daily life.

Example Careers

Students who complete this degree program may be prepared for the following careers. Advanced degrees or certifications may be required for academic or clinical positions. Career examples include but are not limited to:

Biological Sciences Professor


  • Growth: 9.3%
  • Median Salary*: $85,600
  Bright Outlook

Family Practice Medical Doctor (FP MD)


  • Growth: 6.1%
  • Median Salary*: $207,380
  Bright Outlook

Fish and Wildlife Biologist


  • Growth: 3.9%
  • Median Salary*: $66,350
Green Occupation

Genetic Counselor


  • Growth: 21.5%
  • Median Salary*: $85,700
  Bright Outlook

High School Teacher


  • Growth: 3.8%
  • Median Salary*: $62,870

Life Scientist


  • Growth: 4.6%
  • Median Salary*: $82,000
  Bright Outlook

Physical Therapist (PT)


  • Growth: 18.2%
  • Median Salary*: $91,010
  Bright Outlook

Physician Assistant (PA)


  • Growth: 31.3%
  • Median Salary*: $115,390
  Bright Outlook

Veterinarian (Vet)


  • Growth: 15.9%
  • Median Salary*: $99,250
  Bright Outlook

Zoologist


  • Growth: 5.5%
  • Median Salary*: $63,490
  Bright Outlook

* Data obtained from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA).



Global Opportunities

Global Experience

With over 250 programs in more than 65 countries (ranging from one week to one year), study abroad is possible for all ASU students wishing to gain global skills and knowledge in preparation for a 21st-century career. Students earn ASU credit for completed courses, while staying on track for graduation, and may apply financial aid and scholarships toward program costs. https://mystudyabroad.asu.edu





Program Contact Information

If you have questions related to admission, please click here to request information and an admission specialist will reach out to you directly.