News

ASU researchers are working to improve aspects of lung engineering that may in the future contribute to providing a nearly limitless supply of donor organs, ideally matched to their recipients, or to repairing damaged lungs.
Which military branch's ROTC at ASU is among the oldest in the nation? Which ASU college has the highest percentage of veteran and service members? Find out that and more about the military at ASU, just in time for Memorial Day.
Researchers from Arizona State University, along with more than 40 other experts from around the world, are convening in Washington, D.C., on May 18-21 to study ways to create a sustainable phosphorus fertilizer system.
In an effort to better understand the role humanity plays in the future preservation of nature, School of Life Sciences professors Ben Minteer and Stephen Pyne brought distinguished environmental w
Four students from Barrett, The Honors College won recognition for their research posters presented at the 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in San Jose, California.
The era of human evolution is inseparable from the evolution of fire, according to ASU School of Life Sciences Regents' Professor Stephen Pyne.
ASU researcher Charles Arntzen has been chosen as the No. 1 honoree among Fast Company's annual "100 Most Creative People in Business" for his leadership role in developing ZMapp, a therapeutic produced in tobacco to fight Ebola.
Anika Larson never knew she would spend time inside a state prison during her stellar career at Arizona State University. But teaching biology to maximum-security inmates in a prison classroom was something she just couldn't pass up.
After moving from Utah to Phoenix to sell alarms door-to-door, Brian Burrows decided he was ready to make a change. At age 27, he applied to ASU to study animal physiology and behavior, as well as biochemistry.
After four years of winning research and academic awards, senior Ryan Muller is graduating with his dream in sight: pursuing synthetic biology as a graduate student.
The number of STEM students enrolled at ASU has dramatically increased in the past 12 years. Behind the numbers, however, is something of a revolution in teaching, in personalizing education and in focus.
When Ashleigh Gonzales decided to study molecular bioscience and biotechnology, a highly visual major, some wondered if the blind woman had bitten off more than she could chew. Graduating with a master's degree, she has proved her doubters wrong.

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